Biden leads Trump by 14 points in new national poll

A new national poll is out showing former Vice President Joe Biden with a significant lead over President Trump. In a New York Times/Siena College national poll of registered voters released on Wednesday, Biden leads Trump by 14 percentage...

Biden leads Trump by 14 points in new national poll

A new national poll is out showing former Vice President Joe Biden with a significant lead over President Trump.

In a New York Times/Siena College national poll of registered voters released on Wednesday, Biden leads Trump by 14 percentage points, earning 50 percent support compared to Trump's 36 percent. Biden leads by "enormous margins" among Black and Hispanic voters, and the two are roughly tied among "male voters, whites and people in middle age and older — groups that have typically been the backbones of Republican electoral success," the Times reports.

The Times' Alex Burns points to Biden's lead among white women with college degrees as "just staggering," as well, as in the poll, the presumptive Democratic nominee beat Trump among this group by 39 percentage points; exit polls from 2016 showed former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton leading with this group by seven points. Biden "is improving on Clinton's performance vs. Trump almost across the board," Burns says.

The poll also shows Trump taking a hit on the issues of the coronavirus pandemic and race relations. Particularly "striking," the Times says, is that even among one of Trump's "strongest constituencies," whites over 65, about two-fifths disapprove of the way he's handled race relations and the pandemic.

This is another tough poll for Trump to emerge in recent weeks, including one from CNN that also showed Biden with a 14-point lead over the president. The Trump campaign sent CNN a cease and desist letter over this poll, a letter that the network promptly rejected. A forecast on the 2020 election from The Economist now shows Biden with an 85 percent change of winning the Electoral College.

The poll from The New York Times and Siena College was conducted by speaking to 1,337 registered voters from June 17-22. The margin of error is three percentage points. Read more at The New York Times.